Nesting greetings card - pack of 8
Nesting greetings card - pack of 8
Nesting greetings card - pack of 8
Nesting greetings card - pack of 8
Nesting greetings card - pack of 8
Nesting greetings card - pack of 8
Nesting greetings card - pack of 8

Nesting greetings card - pack of 8

£20.00

Hidden in the tangled, wild hedgerow you may glimpse a blackbird flitting in and out between the new green leaves of the Elder, her beak full of twigs and roots carefully chosen to build a cosy nest for her brood. This nest - hidden, fragile, safe, precious – will be where her eggs are kept warm and her nestlings are nourished.

These designs, inspired by the European blackbird, are perfect to let loved ones know you are thinking of them.

This pack contains:

  • 4 x blackbird feather cards and envelopes
  • 4 x blackbird nest cards and envelopes

Size: 10.5 x 14.8 cm
Envelope: 
recycled brown fleck Kraft
Card: 300gsm 100% recycled card
Medium: watercolour, dip pen and ink, Photoshop

Blackbird feather card

Inside: blank
Back: Male blackbirds are thought to have black feathers because black can be easily seen against most of nature’s colours. Outside of the breeding season blackbirds roost together and some arrive in the UK as a flock. Their black colouring helps blackbirds find each other in order to form flocks that confuse predators.

Blackbird nest card

Front: “All the eggs in a nest are kept nicely warm…Being starts with well-being.” - Gaston Bachelard
Inside: blank
Text on back: 
Blackbird nests are built by the female low down in hedgerows, trees and climbers. She uses grass, straw and small twigs to create the outer nest, then plasters the inside with mud and lines it with fine grass. The hidden nest can take up to two weeks to create and may be the home for up to three broods. The female nestles on her eggs and, once hatched, both parents feed the chicks with earthworms and caterpillars. After around two weeks the chicks start to flutter around near the safety of the nest until they can fly. The male blackbird looks after the fledgelings while the female lays the next clutch of eggs. After three weeks the fledgelings are ready to make their own way in the world.